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Watch On Biblify

by Randy White Ministries Friday, Jun 7, 2024

Download a PDF outline here: https://humble-sidecar-837.notion.site/Handouts-ccb6f7e23f78420ea81e7adcc59a946c?pvs=4

**Colossians: Understanding The Mystery
Session 7: Colossians 2:6-10 | Complete In Christ**

Colossians 2:6 | Walking In Christ



Verse 6 - Blue



In Colossians 2:6, Paul states, "As ye have therefore received Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk ye in him." This phrase "received Christ" should be understood not in a metaphysical sense, but in practical terms. This is similar to how Paul uses the term in other contexts. For instance, in Philippians 4:9, Paul says, "Those things, which ye have both learned, and received, and heard, and seen in me, do: and the God of peace shall be with you." Here, "received" clearly refers to the practical application of teachings and instructions.

Similarly, in 1 Thessalonians 4:1, Paul urges, "Furthermore then we beseech you, brethren, and exhort you by the Lord Jesus, that as ye have received of us how ye ought to walk and to please God, so ye would abound more and more." Again, the emphasis is on the practical outworking of the teachings the Thessalonians have received.

In Acts 11:1, we read, "And the apostles and brethren that were in Judaea heard that the Gentiles had also received the word of God." Here, receiving the word of God denotes accepting and applying the message of the gospel, rather than any mystical or metaphysical experience.

Therefore, in Colossians 2:6, Paul is emphasizing the practical reception of Christ that the Colossians had displayed. To "receive Christ" means to accept His teachings, to believe in His person and work. The opposite of receiving Christ, in this context, would be to reject that which has been shared about Christ.

Paul encourages the natural result of receiving Christ, which is to walk in Him. It's worth noting that the word "as" is used as an adverb. It implies that we should walk in Him in the same manner that we received Him, presumably with eagerness, joy, and anticipation. Therefore, this verse is not merely commanding us to walk in Him, but is advising us on "how" to do so. It assumes that we will walk in Him, and instructs us on the manner in which to do so.

It is an interesting point to note that Paul does not prescribe a specific way to "walk in Christ" but instead encourages believers to do so in the manner they received Him. This in itself is a testament to the inclusive and diverse nature of faith. People come to faith in different ways, and this is recognized and honored. Some may be overwhelmed and eager, immediately ready to dive into their new journey with Christ, while others may be more cautious, testing the waters before fully immersing themselves.

Paul's words suggest a recognition and validation of these individual approaches to faith. By stating "as ye have therefore received Christ Jesus the Lord, so walk ye in him," he implies that God recognizes and honors our individual experiences and personalities. This is a liberating perspective, as it allows for personal approaches to faith, without enforcing a rigid or prescribed way of practicing it. Ultimately, it underscores the idea that the relationship with Christ is a personal one, shaped by individual characteristics, experiences, and the unique way each person has received Him.

Colossians 2:7-9 | Admonition To Christ



Verse 7 - Blue



In verse 7, Paul begins his admonition with a celebration of the maturity of the faith of the Colossians. This is quite remarkable, considering Paul has never been with them physically (v. 5). Yet, they are described as being "Rooted and built up in him, and stablished in the faith." This speaks to the quality of teaching they have received.

Many scholars believe that Epaphras, mentioned in Col. 1:7-8 and 4:12-13, might have been their teacher or pastor. Epaphras, described as a "fellow prisoner" with Paul in Philemon 1:23, must have been an extraordinary teacher of Paul's doctrine. The faith of the Colossians stands as a testament to his skill and dedication.

The Colossians are said to have come to this strong position in Christ while "abounding in thanksgiving." This suggests a community of believers characterized by joy and gratitude. It must have been one of the most joyful and honorable churches in Paul's circle of influence.

Verse 8 - Blue



After praising their faith in verse 7, Paul issues a stern warning: do not be swayed from your strong faith. Remarkably, Paul worries that those who are "Rooted and built up in him, and established in the faith" (v. 7) might abandon it all for "the rudiments of the world". If this is Paul's concern, then none of us are immune to deception, no matter how deeply rooted and built up we are. Paul fears that the "philosophy and vain deceit" following "the tradition of men, after the rudiments of the world," could make them vulnerable to the enemy.

Paul's letter to the Colossians warns of three weapons that can potentially lead even the most steadfast believer astray. These potential pitfalls are:

1. Philosophy: The term "philosophy" is consistently used in a negative context in the New Testament. It refers to worldly wisdom or human reasoning rather than God’s revelation. While philosophy can stimulate intellectual curiosity, Paul cautions that it leads believers away from the simplicity and truth of the Scripture. Sadly, much of modern Christianity has become nothing more than philosophical discussion under the guise of Bible study.
2. Vain Deceit: This refers to empty, misleading beliefs based on false pretenses or promises. This is a deceptive tactic that can readily lead the uninformed or unsuspecting believer astray. It's a less sophisticated approach compared to philosophy, but it can be just as damaging, especially to those who do not question the assumptions.
3. The Tradition of Men: Even traditions within a church or denomination can be harmful if they are based on human ideas rather than God's Word. Tradition isn't inherently bad; it becomes a problem when it's based on philosophy or vain deceit and is accepted without being measured against biblical truth. The church has often been slow to reject such traditions, which can lead to legalism, ritualism, or a misplaced emphasis on human effort over God's grace.

Paul's admonition serves as a reminder that our faith should be rooted in Christ alone and not swayed by human wisdom, deceptive arguments, or misplaced traditions.

Verse 9 - Blue



In verse 9, Paul once again celebrates Christ, stating that "in Him dwelleth all the fulness of the Godhead bodily." This is a powerful affirmation of the divinity of Christ, echoing his statements in chapter 1, verses 15-18. According to Paul, Christ is not just a messenger or servant of God, but He is the full embodiment of God Himself - all the fullness of God is in Him.

This assertion has profound implications. If all the fullness of God is in Christ, then there is no need to seek spiritual fulfillment or enlightenment beyond Christ. Everything that we need to know about God, everything that we need for our spiritual journey, is found in Christ. He is the source of all truth, wisdom, and knowledge. To seek these things outside of Christ, according to Paul, is misguided and unnecessary.

This notion contradicts the teachings of those who might encourage believers to go beyond the teachings of Christ as revealed in the Scripture, suggesting that there are other sources of spiritual knowledge or other paths to God. Paul strongly disputes this, arguing that Christ alone is sufficient. He is the ultimate revelation of God - the fullness of the Godhead in bodily form. Therefore, our focus should always be on Christ, His teachings, and His example. Any teaching that deviates from this focus, according to Paul, is fundamentally flawed.

Colossians 2:10 | Complete In Christ



Verse 10 - Blue



I have what I call the “Ye +” rule. Typically, "ye" is used to address a group of people. However, when "ye" is followed by a plural, it underscores the individuality of each member in that group, implying that the message applies to each and every individual within that group. This rule helps in interpreting the text, offering a deeper understanding of the individual's role within the collective.

Here is a breakdown of the "Ye +" rule:

Ye +

Meaning

Singular

Emphasizes the collective nature of the group as a single entity.

Plural

Emphasizes the individual members within the group.

Here are some examples:

Ye +

Meaning

Example

Singular

Emphasizes the collective nature of the group as a single entity.

"Ye must be born again" (John 3:7)

Singular

Emphasizes the collective nature of the group as a single entity.

"Ye are the light of the world" (Matthew 5:14)

Singular

Emphasizes the collective nature of the group as a single entity.

"Ye are the salt of the earth" (Matthew 5:13)

Singular

Emphasizes the collective nature of the group as a single entity.

"Ye are a chosen generation" (1 Peter 2:9)

Singular

Emphasizes the collective nature of the group as a single entity.

"Ye are the temple of God" (1 Corinthians 3:16)

Plural

Emphasizes the individual members within the group.

"Ye are complete in him" (Colossians 2:10)

Plural

Emphasizes the individual members within the group.

"Ye are all children of God" (Galatians 3:26)

Plural

Emphasizes the individual members within the group.

"Ye are washed, ye are sanctified" (1 Corinthians 6:11)

Singular and Plural

Both in the same verse

“Ye are the body of Christ, and members in particular" (1 Corinthians 12:27)

Sometimes, the distinction between singular and plural can be detected in English; however, the English language lacks the nuanced differentiation between singular and plural "you." Therefore, to accurately interpret the scripture, it's often necessary to refer to the original Greek text or a Greek interlinear Bible. These resources provide a more precise understanding of the original language, revealing the specific grammatical constructs used, including when "ye" is followed by a singular or plural noun.

This grammar lesson is crucial because it helps us understand whether we are individually or collectively complete in Him. The Bible reveals an astonishing truth here: Each of us, individually, is complete in Him. This completeness is based on our grace-gift salvation, not on our collective agreement or partnership with one another in Christ. Therefore, each one of us, individually, shares a complete and fulfilling relationship with Him. This truth is empowering and liberating, as it means that our spiritual completeness does not depend on our relationship with others, but solely on our personal relationship with Christ.

Not only are we individually complete in Christ, but our completeness is found in Him who is described as "the head of all principality and power." In other words, our completeness is rooted in the One who holds supreme authority over all realms, both seen and unseen. This is a profound and powerful concept.

The implication of this for believers is significant. If our completeness is found in Christ, and Christ is the ultimate authority over all things, then in Him we have all we need. There is no need to seek additional spiritual experiences or insights outside of our salvation and standing in Christ.

Therefore, being complete in Him who is "the head of all principality and power" means that nothing else matters. We don't need to be swayed by the philosophies, traditions, or spiritual practices of the world. We don't need to fret about our spiritual status or seek validation from any other source. Our completeness in Christ is all-sufficient. It provides us with everything we need for our spiritual journey. This truth is both liberating and empowering, as it frees us from the need to seek anything beyond Christ for our spiritual fulfillment.

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